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Rev’d Dr Jane Foulcher

Acting Director, St Mark’s National Theological Centre

ABOUT JANE FOULCHER

BA Hons (Sydney), Grad Dip Div (SCD), PhD (CSU)

Jane Foulcher is Senior Lecturer in Theology at St Mark’s National Theological Centre, a partner in the School of Theology of Charles Sturt University. She is an Anglican priest with experience in urban and regional contexts, and in chaplaincy as well as parish ministry. Jane has been an academic associate in the School of Theology since 2007, teaching in systematic and practical theology, as well as in St Mark’s formation program for Anglican ordination candidates.

Profile

Jane Foulcher is Senior Lecturer in Theology at St Mark’s National Theological Centre, a partner in the School of Theology of Charles Sturt University. She is an Anglican priest with experience in urban and regional contexts, and in chaplaincy as well as parish ministry. Jane has been an academic associate in the School of Theology since 2007, teaching in systematic and practical theology, as well as in St Mark’s formation program for Anglican ordination candidates.

Jane’s has a particular interest in the relationship between theology and practice. Her doctoral research, in the area of monastic theology, was published as Reclaiming Humility: Four Studies in the Monastic Tradition. Here current research interests include trauma and flourishing, mystical and negative theology.

 


 

Publications

Books

  • Reclaiming Humility: Four Studies in the Monastic Tradition. Collegeville, MN: Cistercian Publications, 2015.

Articles

  • “Sharing the Peace of Christ: Worship in a Year of Crisis.” St Mark’s Review 253, no. 3 (2020): 26-37.
  • “Response to Don E. Davis and Sarah Gazaway.” In The Joy of Humility: The Beginning and End of the Virtues, edited by Drew Collins, Ryan McAnnally-Linz and Evan C. Rosa, 155-59. Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2020.
  • “Response to Norman Wirzba.” In The Joy of Humility: The Beginning and End of the Virtues, edited by Drew Collins, Ryan McAnnally-Linz and Evan C. Rosa, 122-25. Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2020.
  • “Nuit De Feu: Christian De Chergé and Prayer with the Other.” Spiritus: A Journal of Christian Spirituality 18, no. 2 (2018): 218-30.
  • “Review of the Tenderness of God: Reclaiming Our Humanity. By Gillian T. W. Ahlgren. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2017. Xvii + 168 Pages. $29.00. .” Horizons 45 (2018): 441-42.
  • “Hildegard Meets Moltmann: The Shape of Hope in the Book of Divine Works.” In The Greening of Hope: Hildegard for Australia, edited by Katherine Massam and Fotini Toso, 91-106. Northcote, VIC: Morning Star Publishing, 2016.
  • “Ageing, Humility, and the Monastery.” Journal of Religion, Spirituality and Aging 26, no. 2-3 (2014): 148-59.
  • “Humility: Christian De Chergé and the ‘Other’.” In Speaking Differently: Essays on Theological Anthropology, edited by Phillip Wayne Tolliday and Heather Thomson, 105-23. Barton, ACT: Barton Books, 2013.
  • “1st April: Palm Sunday: Mark 11.1-11.” The Expository Times 123, no. 6 (2012): 283-85.
  • “Sharing the Poetry of Grace: The Theologian as Preacher.” In Embracing Grace: Essays in Honour of Graeme Garrett, edited by Heather Thomson, 23-36. Barton, ACT: Barton Books, 2009.
  • “Hand Dances and Waltzes: Reclaiming Common Worship for the Twenty-First Century.” In ‘Wonderful and Confessedly Strange’: Australian Essays in Anglican Ecclesiology, edited by Bruce Kaye, 157-78. Hindmarsh, SA: ATF Press, 2006.

 


What got you into theology?

Rev'd Dr Jane Foulcher

What got you into theology?

“I’ve been asking theological questions for as long as I can remember – even though I might not have known they were theological questions! Questions about God, the nature of existence and our place in the world. The first time I recall articulating a theological question was on a youth camp in my early teens. We had been invited to post our questions in the Question Box! My question was “Should we call the Holy Spirit he or it?” I don’t remember the response, but undoubtedly, in the days before we thought about gendered language for God, the answer was “He.” My first foray into trinitarian theology, minus a feminist perspective! Later, studying history at the University of Sydney, I wrote an essay on Anslem’s Cur Deus Homo (Why God became Man), studied the Reformation with the great Puritan scholar Patrick Collinson, and did an honours thesis on women and the medieval dualist heresy Catharism. I think I was a theologian in waiting, but sadly no one recognised or encouraged this at the time (including me). So, I didn’t undertake theological studies until I was well into my thirties and juggling full time employment and two children. I am thrilled that things are different for young women today!”

What do you enjoy about teaching at St Mark’s?

“I love seeing students open to new horizons. For example, students with a background in Pentecostal churches finding an affinity with the medieval writer theologian Julian of Norwich. Or students who begin with negative views on ‘ritual’, ‘liturgy’ or ‘tradition’ coming to understand their positive contribution to Christian Worship of all styles.”

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